UseInSentence Examples of words in sentences

Aberrant in a Sentence

Examples of aberrant in a sentence

Aberrant is a pretty challenging word, but we're here to help you better understand it...with EXAMPLES!

When learning new words, it's important to see how they're used, or to see them in the different contexts in which they're often used, and that's just what we'll do to help you better understand aberrant (and many other English words!). By seeing different ways you can use aberrant in a sentence, as well as synonyms and antonyms of aberrant, you will have a much better grasp on how it should be used, and you'll feel more confortable with using it much sooner.

Below you will find the definition of aberrant, followed by 37 sample sentences (from real sources), gradually increasing in length.


aberrant(ăbˈər-ənt, ă-bĕrˈ-)

(noun) - one whose behavior departs substantially from the norm of a group

View more definitions below


EXAMPLES - Aberrant in a Sentence

  1. The same can be said for traditional views on "aberrant". (source)
  2. More conspicuously aberrant is an example I read over the weekend: (source)
  3. They rely on families to actually report what they call aberrant behavior. (source)
  4. Your "aberrant" ideology comes with a price which August 29, 2008 by entplex (source)
  5. a law allowing homosexuals to marry in the capital, calling the ruling "aberrant" and (source)
  6. A world leader with a view of a portion of his law-abiding constituency as being 'aberrant'. (source)
  7. Honestly, is calling homosexuality "aberrant" behavior really going to fly over the long haul? (source)
  8. Lavatta Smith, 34, has a history of "aberrant" behaviors, Milwaukee police Chief Edward Flynn said. (source)
  9. Let's make absolutely sure that there isn't some kind of aberrant diagnosing pattern that's developed. (source)
  10. The experts tend to describe the minority that continues to flout the law as '' aberrant '' and '' fringe ''. (source)
  11. Mr Scalzi, I hope you realize that giving publicity to this kind of aberrant behavior only encourages imitators: (source)
  12. Bill O'Reilly tells us constantly how "liberal" they are, so this must be some kind of aberrant editing error, no doubt. (source)
  13. You (and Iain Dale) miss the truly shocking thing on the leaflet, namely the aberrant apostrophe after Simon Hughes 'name. (source)
  14. Instead, he hounded her out of the community, because her "aberrant" sexuality deviated from his perceptions of female respectability. (source)
  15. Much harsher was the comment of Emmanuelle Perreux, chairman of the magistrates 'union (SM), who defined the postponement as "aberrant". " (source)
  16. "More troubling" is that more senior officers and DOD civilians ignored "unmistakable signs" of increasingly "aberrant" behavior, the report states. (source)
  17. Sky-diving is also "aberrant" in that it deviates from normal behavior (people don't usually throw themselves out of airplanes for fun, but a select few DO). (source)
  18. Although the media is quick to list the "aberrant" characteristics of a school shooter, the truth is that they fit all teens at some point in their adolescence! (source)
  19. Species and groups of species which are called aberrant, and which may fancifully be called living fossils, will aid us in forming a picture of the ancient forms of life. (source)
  20. Instead he stated that the placentas of placental mammals showed more similarities to structures in amphibians, thus making the monotremes some kind of aberrant offshoots. (source)
  21. From this point of view, one could say the counterculture was a kind of conservatism, framed in an inflammatory way as radical and "aberrant" by defenders of the status quo. (source)
  22. That suggests that the Washington Post poll, which reported a figure of 21%, was not a fluke or an "outlier," as Joe and pollster-folk like to call aberrant polls that you can't trust. (source)
  23. This nation has so effectively imbued them with its ethos of race-neutral equality and justice that they are less tolerant of race-based "aberrant" behavior, be it from cops or anyone else. (source)
  24. Asked about an even harsher description of homosexuality -- back in 1992 Huckabee described it as not just "aberrant," but an "unnatural, and sinful lifestyle" -- Carter said Huckabee stood by it. (source)
  25. They had been coming to my house about every two weeks since the election last year and even more often since January, each time wanting to discuss my "aberrant" politics and to explain to me the wisdom of The Change. (source)
  26. Although we are never told the specific reason for the shaming and ostracism of Peggy Mountain, we are left with a very strong impression that central to the issue was the priest's anxiety over "aberrant" female sexuality. (source)
  27. In a glowing endorsement of Democrat presidential contender Barack Obama, Mr Morgan described the choice of the Alaskan governor to run alongside John McCain as "aberrant", and revealed he was unable to take Mrs Palin seriously. (source)
  28. Reporting from Mexico City- Gunmen stormed a crowded casino in northern Mexico on Thursday and ignited a fire that trapped patrons inside, killing at least 53 people in what the nation's president called an "aberrant act of terror." (source)
  29. Ham's report on that matter recommended disciplinary action against six people, most of them at Walter Reed Army Medical Center, who, according to Ham's report, ignored clear signs of the psychiatrist's increasingly "aberrant" behavior. " (source)
  30. I don't believe that those who choose to have sex with animals is any more prevalent than in other farming communities - and to suggest otherwise is a feeble attempt to justify one's personal behavior that "aberrant" only begins to explain ... (source)
  31. Thus if Australia were destroyed, Didelphys in S. America would be wonderfully anomalous (this is your case with Proteaceae), whereas now there are so many genera and little sub-families of Marsupiata that the group cannot be called aberrant or anomalous. (source)
  32. You cannot convincingly argue that Vivienne Eliot should not have been placed in an insane asylum while documenting behavior that a number of people highly accustomed to and tolerant of "aberrant" social behavior considered beyond the pale and unacceptable. (source)
  33. Is Hamlet's father an anomaly of an entity existing on a "different plane" being perceptible on this one, an example of something physically aberrant, something which is not a part of nature and therefore not bound by its limits -- in short, a supernatural being? (source)
  34. And Levine's caricature of her with arms monstrously swollen to fearsomeness, her nose turning downward into a Levantine sneer, her eyes deeply shadowed, exudes a gypsy-ish cast of "aberrant" femininity, ejecting the author out of the West to which she so patently belongs. (source)
  35. This would mean that the morphological criteria on which extant supposed D. arnoldi and D. hololissa have been identified are utterly unreliable: an idea which matches suggestions that 'carapace morphology is sensitive to environmental conditions and that captivity can result in aberrant morphologies' (Palkovacs et al. 2003, p. 1409; see also Gerlach 2004b). (source)
  36. What planet had manufactured it, how long it had worked, as a central office organizer, with what company-a giant company known throughout most of the First Galaxy, and Worsel was impressed; Arrow-22 could have been more important than the president and board chairman combined-how it had been constantly modified, and finally how it had been judged "- aberrant" and "prone to mech-psychoses" and how it was replaced, far too expensive to "fix." (source)
  37. First, as to the bats and seals: they are what zoologists call aberrant and highly specialised types, and therefore precisely those which might be expected to display a fixity and want of pliancy in their organisation, or the smallest possible aptitude for deviating in new directions towards new structures, and the acquisition of such altered habits as a change from aquatic to terrestrial or from Volant to non-volant modes of living would imply. (source)

Sentence Information

The average Flesch reading-ease score of the 37 example sentences provided below is 41.0, which suggests that "aberrant" is a difficult word that tends to be used by individuals of higher education, and is likely found in more advanced literature or in academia.


ABERRANT SYNONYMS

We have 17 synonyms for aberrant.

abnormal, atypical, bizarre, deviant, different, flaky, mental, nonstandard, odd, off-base, off-color, out of line, peculiar, psycho, strange, unusual, weird


ABERRANT ANTONYMS

We have 5 antonyms for aberrant.

normal, regular, same, true, usual


PRONUNCIATION & SYLLABIFICATION

Pronunciation: (ăbˈər-ənt, ă-bĕrˈ-)

Syllabification: ab-er-rant


DEFINITIONS

View up to 25 definitions of aberrant from 5 different sources, as well as parts of speech.


from The American Heritage© Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition
  1. (adjective) Deviating from the proper or expected course.
  2. (adjective) Deviating from what is normal; untrue to type.
  3. (noun) One that is aberrant.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License
  1. (noun) A person or object that deviates from what is normal in his group.
  2. (noun) A group, individual, or structure that deviates from the usual or natural type, especially with an atypical chromosone number.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English
  1. (adjective) Wandering; straying from the right way.
  2. (adjective) Deviating from the ordinary or natural type; exceptional; abnormal.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
  1. (None) Wandering; straying from the right or usual course.
  2. (None) In zoology and botany, differing in some of its characters from the group in which it is placed: said of an individual, a species, a genus, etc.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.
  1. (noun) one whose behavior departs substantially from the norm of a group
  2. (adjective) markedly different from an accepted norm