UseInSentence Examples of words in sentences

Cadence in a Sentence

Examples of cadence in a sentence

Cadence is a pretty tough word, but we're here to help you better understand it...with EXAMPLES!

When learning new words, it's important to see how they're used, or to see them in the different contexts in which they're often used, and that's just what we'll do to help you better understand cadence (and many other English words!). By seeing different ways you can use cadence in a sentence, as well as synonyms and antonyms of cadence, you will have a much better grasp on how it should be used, and you'll feel more confortable with using it much sooner.

Below you will find the definition of cadence, followed by 39 sample sentences (from real sources), gradually increasing in length.


cadence(kādˈns)

(noun) - the close of a musical section

View more definitions below


EXAMPLES - Cadence in a Sentence

  1. This time the cadence was the tune of the Lampions. (source)
  2. This time the cadence was the tune of the _Lampions_. (source)
  3. One way is by measuring the "cadence" of their typing. (source)
  4. Also, his word cadence is really starting to bother me. (source)
  5. His cadence is great, and his voice is almost charming in a way. (source)
  6. Has anyone noticed that their bullet points have a certain cadence? (source)
  7. I can still recall the cadence of the first lines as they fell upon my ears. (source)
  8. Because of its directness the cadence V-- I is called the _authentic cadence_. (source)
  9. "They can play ... they're used to taking a snap, calling a cadence and calling a play." (source)
  10. "By calling cadence, the Soldiers stay in step and it also helps control their breathing," (source)
  11. One of the major factors for the sharp differences in his cadence is his use of the teleprompter. (source)
  12. "We expect all the NCOs (Noncommissioned Officers) to take turns calling cadence," Schwaigert said. (source)
  13. "By calling cadence, the Soldiers stay in step and it also helps control their breathing," Angha said. (source)
  14. There is no actual third sung in the deceptive cadence, which is license to pull a snap minor/major switch. (source)
  15. Light pulsed their length in cadence with the wings, indicating the transmitter within the creature was functional. (source)
  16. Another half of his mind chanted an Our Father as the three-meter shadow appeared at the crest of the dune, four feet moving in cadence. (source)
  17. It would probably be good just to write one in third-person, but with the kind of cadence and language the first-person narrator would use. (source)
  18. A lot of the companies that have been built outside of Silicon Valley ... seem to be on a longer-term cadence than the ones in Silicon Valley.'' (source)
  19. Typing 'cadence' used to identify authorized database users, lock everyone else out Steve Jobs is a recipient of the Jim Henson Celebration Honor Award (source)
  20. I think if you look at the long-term cadence of the industry, we've consistently expanded margins as we move through the last decade, and we've done that. (source)
  21. During the run, Soldiers get even more motivated and call cadence even louder when someone grabs the guideon, the unit flag, and runs around the formation. (source)
  22. NEW YORK AP -- The NFL reminded teams of the rule prohibiting defensive players from mimicking the offense's signal-calling cadence after Dallas accused the (source)
  23. For Lt. Dan Choi, the day began with a jog around Washington's memorials, calling cadence at 8 a.m. with fellow veterans and supporters before joining the march. (source)
  24. No. 1 is illustrated in Ex. 15; No. 2, in Ex. 42 and the first four measures of Ex. 43 (cadence not perfect, it is true, but same phrase-melody and _same cadence_); No. 3 is seen in Ex. 44 (source)
  25. A line of zombies had formed at every house on the block, their "Trick or Treat!" chants in cadence, some adding the "Smell my feet" followed by the demand to "Give me something good to eat." (source)
  26. They (meaning "The Man") also say that calling cadence during a run helps regulate breathing, but I suppose that's assuming that you are actually still able to breathe while running in the first place. (source)
  27. Kele Okereke's first solo album begins with a blaring, fuzzy off-beat and the Bloc Party singer starting a military calling cadence: "I don't what you been told/But this don't stand/Walk tall, walk tall." (source)
  28. The NFL reminded teams of the rule prohibiting defensive players from mimicking the offense's signal-calling cadence after Dallas accused the Washington Redskins of causing the Cowboys to bungle several snaps. (source)
  29. Don't mimic: The NFL reminded teams of the rule prohibiting defensive players from mimicking the offense's signal-calling cadence after Dallas accused the Redskins of causing the Cowboys to bungle several snaps. (source)
  30. The cadential effect is generally produced by two or three chords, the last one of which is called the cadence-chord, and stands, when the cadence is perfectly regular, upon an accented beat of the final measure. (source)
  31. NEW YORK - The NFL reminded teams of the rule prohibiting defensive players from mimicking the offense's signal-calling cadence after Dallas accused the Washington Redskins of causing the Cowboys to bungle several snaps. (source)
  32. Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 3rd Battalion, 157th Field Artillery, Colorado Army National Guard, run along one of the main roads at North Fort Hood calling cadence loudly enough to let the rest of the sleeping Soldiers assigned to the (source)
  33. (Saturday -- 04 / 11 / 2009 -- Clemson, S.C. -- PHOTOGRAPH BY Rich Glickstein / rglickstein@thestate. com) -- White No. 11 Kyle Parker calls cadence during Clemson's Orange and White spring football scrimmage at Memorial Stadium in Clemson, S.C., (source)
  34. The cadence is the point of Repose which creates the necessary contrast with the condition of Action that prevails more or less constantly during the phrase; and the effect of this point of repose is, therefore, to separate one phrase from the next. (source)
  35. Every word smelt of the meadowsweet that grew thick upon the banks; now, as he recalled the cadence and the phrase that had seemed so charming, he saw again the ferns beneath the vaulted roots of the beech, and the green light of the glowworm in the hedge. (source)
  36. Cadenza, the Italian word for cadence, is the name given to an unaccompanied bravura passage introduced at or near the close of a movement as a brilliant climax, particularly in solo concertos of a virtuoso character where the element of display is prominent. (source)
  37. If poetic cadence, for example, resonatesor more to the point, if what we believe about the allure of cadence is that it answers to a rhythm essentially held within usthen we are, it is true, treading on structuralist ground: poetics touches us at the level of resonance sounding deep within us. (source)
  38. Sharkoon's USB 3.0 SATA HDD dock doubles up, now handles two drives Typing 'cadence' used to identify authorized database users, lock everyone else out Jurassic space: Ancient galaxies come together after billions of years Tiny molecular 'trash' may tell big story about cardiovascular disease risk (source)
  39. -- The most natural and characteristic indication of a cadence is the _longer tone_, seen in the examples to which reference has just been made; for a tone of greater length than its fellows is, in itself, the most conclusive evidence of a point of repose, as compared with the shorter tones in the course of the sentence, whose more prompt succession indicates the action of the phrase. (source)

Sentence Information

The average Flesch reading-ease score of the 39 example sentences provided below is 57.0, which suggests that "cadence" is a fairly difficult word that is likely understood by a majority of individuals with an undergraduate degree, and may be found in ocassionaly in news articles or other forms of literature.


CADENCE SYNONYMS

We have 14 synonyms for cadence.

accent, beat, count, inflection, intonation, lilt, measure, meter, modulation, pulse, rhythmus, swing, tempo, throb


CADENCE ANTONYMS

We have 0 antonyms for cadence.


PRONUNCIATION & SYLLABIFICATION

Pronunciation: (kādˈns)

Syllabification: ca-dence


DEFINITIONS

View up to 25 definitions of cadence from 5 different sources, as well as parts of speech.


from The American Heritage© Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition
  1. (noun) Balanced, rhythmic flow, as of poetry or oratory.
  2. (noun) The measure or beat of movement, as in dancing or marching.
  3. (noun) A falling inflection of the voice, as at the end of a sentence.
  4. (noun) General inflection or modulation of the voice.
  5. (noun) Music A progression of chords moving to a harmonic close, point of rest, or sense of resolution.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License
  1. (noun) Balanced, rhythmic flow.
  2. (noun) The measure or beat of movement.
  3. (noun) The general inflection or modulation of the voice.
  4. (noun) A progression of at least two chords which conclude a piece of music, section or musical phrases within it. Sometimes referred to analogously as musical punctuation.
  5. (noun) A fall in inflection of a speaker’s voice, such as at the end of a sentence.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English
  1. (noun) The act or state of declining or sinking.
  2. (noun) A fall of the voice in reading or speaking, especially at the end of a sentence.
  3. (noun) A rhythmical modulation of the voice or of any sound.
  4. (noun) Rhythmical flow of language, in prose or verse.
  5. (noun) Harmony and proportion in motions, as of a well-managed horse.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
  1. (noun) A fall; a decline; a state of falling or sinking.
  2. (noun) A fall of the voice in reading or speaking, as at the end of a sentence; also, the falling of the voice in the general modulation of tones in reciting.
  3. (noun) A regular and agreeable succession of measured sounds or movements; rhythmic flow, as the general modulation of the voice in reading or speaking, or of natural sounds.
  4. (noun) Specifically In music: A harmonic formula or sequence of chords that expresses conclusion, finality, repose, occurring at the end of a phrase or period, and involving a clear enunciation of the tonality or key in which a piece is written. See phrases below.
  5. (noun) The concluding part of a melody or harmony, or the concluding part of a metrical line or verse: as, the plaintive cadence of a song. Also called a fall.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.
  1. (noun) the close of a musical section
  2. (noun) (prosody) the accent in a metrical foot of verse
  3. (noun) a recurrent rhythmical series