UseInSentence Examples of words in sentences

Finite in a Sentence

Examples of finite in a sentence

Finite is a pretty challenging word, but we're here to help you better understand it...with EXAMPLES!

When learning new words, it's important to see how they're used, or to see them in the different contexts in which they're often used, and that's just what we'll do to help you better understand finite (and many other English words!). By seeing different ways you can use finite in a sentence, as well as synonyms and antonyms of finite, you will have a much better grasp on how it should be used, and you'll feel more confortable with using it much sooner.

Below you will find the definition of finite, followed by 47 sample sentences (from real sources), gradually increasing in length.


finite(fīˈnītˌ)

(adjective) - of verbs; relating to forms of the verb that are limited in time by a tense and (usually) show agreement with number and person

View more definitions below


EXAMPLES - Finite in a Sentence

  1. Conjugated forms of a verb are called finite forms. (source)
  2. The notion of the finite is the notion of being having (source)
  3. They could be described as the finite holding infinite. (source)
  4. As for the idea of finite, there is no great difficulty. (source)
  5. It's called a finite element analysis, finite element analysis. (source)
  6. Well, Sikora, I also love the idea of finite and infinite games. (source)
  7. And that would have spelled 'finite' to this band right then and there. (source)
  8. It is the revelation of reason as the finite is the revelation of sense. (source)
  9. Fossil fuel reservoirs are finite, which is the main reason that prices are rising. (source)
  10. Assuming that it's finite is at least as big an error as assuming that it's infinite. (source)
  11. Therefore, a backwards look would show in finite time a decreasing radius down to a point. (source)
  12. Christopher Hill saying that the list of issues is now down to what he termed a finite set. (source)
  13. It is enough to acknowledge God from things finite, that is, created, in which He is infinitely. (source)
  14. No one disputes that oil supplies are finite, which is reason enough to diversify our energy sources. (source)
  15. In the end, Oberlin did take me, although it did so with what might be described as finite enthusiasm. (source)
  16. Asserting that any material that is obviously in finite supply is not in finite supply is just nonsensical. (source)
  17. Actually James,this is not what happens in most developed countries and they have "finite" amounts of money. (source)
  18. By the way, it's wrong to think a single individual can overtake a population of size infinity in finite time. (source)
  19. I could see him creating the word finitesimal, which would use "finite" suggesting the differences have a definite end. (source)
  20. These local strengths were combined to model the behavior of the whole sphere, a process called finite element analysis, or FEA. (source)
  21. He used his signature technique, called finite element analysis, to create a virtual model of a human skull (belonging to a San hunter-gatherer). (source)
  22. But it's still intriguing that Fitzgerald, for all his gifts, didn't perceive the word "finite" in definite, the way good spellers automatically do. (source)
  23. If God can not _voluntarily_ call a finite existence into being, and thus stand in the relation of cause, He is certainly under the severest limitation. (source)
  24. The mental creations held by You and I, and other finite minds, are but _finite creations of finite minds_, while WE, ourselves, are the finite creations of an (source)
  25. Proceeding in the same train of thought, we may observe that the word finite is the symbol, to our own minds as to the Greek, of strength and reality and truth. (source)
  26. The revealment of the infinite in the finite, which is the motive of all creation, is not seen in its perfection in the starry heavens, in the beauty of flowers. (source)
  27. CFTC Chairman Gary Gensler is holding the hearing on metals as the next step in looking toward the possible imposition of trading limits on all commodities of "finite" supply. (source)
  28. A thing is called finite after its kind, when it can be limited by another thing of the same nature; for instance, a body is called finite because we always conceive another greater body. (source)
  29. Does ID demand an infinite regress of interfering intelligences (impossible in finite time), or is it sufficient that "at least one" intelligence interfered with one species at some point? (source)
  30. Yes, I think that I understand you: you mean to say that the infinite is one class, and that the finite is a second class of existences; but what you would make the third I am not so certain. (source)
  31. Please specify a mathematical model that suggests it is even conceptually possible to front-load a natural system to get exactly one of a desired outcome (or even probably one) in finite time. (source)
  32. General Re had first become entangled in legal and regulatory problems when New York Attorney General Eliot Spitzer started investigating the insurance industry over "finite" reinsurance in 2004. (source)
  33. Todd B: Please specify a mathematical model that suggests it is even conceptually possible to front-load a natural system to get exactly one of a desired outcome (or even probably one) in finite time. (source)
  34. Most people who have a working familiarity with the idea of finite resources understand that those huge underground oceans of oil that people like T. Boone plundered for decades eventually will dry up. (source)
  35. PROTARCHUS: Yes, I think that I understand you: you mean to say that the infinite is one class, and that the finite is a second class of existences; but what you would make the third I am not so certain. (source)
  36. That the good is of the nature of the finite is a peculiarly Hellenic sentiment, which may be compared with the language of those modern writers who speak of virtue as fitness, and of freedom as obedience to law. (source)
  37. A science fiction universe is one in which the universe is finite, that is, it is assumed that all things can, in the end, eventually, even if not within the time frame of the story, be understood (measured, quantified, etc). (source)
  38. The obvious portions of extension that affect our senses, carry with them into the mind the idea of finite: and the ordinary periods of succession, whereby we measure time and duration, as hours, days, and years, are bounded lengths. (source)
  39. It seems useless here to enter upon the vexed subject of 'innate ideas,' or to attempt to convince the reader, metaphysically, that the very negation contained in the word finite, necessarily suggests its affirmation in the word infinite. (source)
  40. In postulating a plurality of angels, we are also assuming that the incorporeal substances or spiritual beings we are considering are finite, which is to say that each is limited by the differences that must obtain among them if they are many. (source)
  41. When we look down into the blueness of some little pool, rejoicing in the birdlike passage of the clouds, and then look up to the wide sky, we realise that the finite is like a lake which, as far as its capacity allows, mirrors the infinite; and when we see the foreshortened image of (source)
  42. It turns out to be impossible, he believes, to think of the "finite" without contrasting it, in implication at least, with the "infinite" which is therefore in consciousness, just as it is impossible to talk of "spaces" without presupposing the one space of which given "spaces" are parts. (source)
  43. (And speaking of crankery, the "population bombers" who have turned a blind eye to 2,000 years of evidence on this to instead sell absurd scare tales of "exponential growth of population until there are more people than atoms in finite world" sure have shown themselves as cranks in that regard.) (source)
  44. AFTER that book is published and it is indicated that the series is "finite" with a definite conclusion, that writer is no longer writing for himself and there is responsibility to Agent, Publisher and CUSTOMERS. which is what the reader is who spends hard earned cash as well as irreplaceable TIME with the product. (source)
  45. The ultimate psychological result was that the brilliant clarity and precision of his imagined forms gathered richness and intensity of suggestion from the vaguer impulses of temperament, and that an association was set up between them which makes it literally true to say that, for Browning, the "finite" is not the rival or the antithesis, but the very language of the (source)
  46. Between little and great things, though the one exceed the other never so much, there is still some proportions provided always that the excess of the thing which exceeds be not an infinite excess: but between finite and infinite there is no proportion, and to make any, it would be necessary, either to raise the finite and make it infinite, or to lower the infinite and make it finite, which is impossible. (source)
  47. The equations for this theory of quantum gravity are term-by-term finite, but the same mechanism that forces each term in the series to be finite also forces the entire series to be infinite i.e., infinities that would otherwise occur in spacetime, consequently destabilizing it, are transferred to the cosmological singularities, thereby preventing the universe from immediately collapsing into nonexistence. (source)

Sentence Information

The average Flesch reading-ease score of the 47 example sentences provided below is 45.0, which suggests that "finite" is a difficult word that tends to be used by individuals of higher education, and is likely found in more advanced literature or in academia.


FINITE SYNONYMS

We have 17 synonyms for finite.

bound, bounded, circumscribed, conditioned, confined, definable, definite, delimited, demarcated, determinate, exact, fixed, limited, precise, restricted, specific, terminable


FINITE ANTONYMS

We have 7 antonyms for finite.

endless, indefinite, infinite, interminable, unfixed, unlimited, unrestricted


PRONUNCIATION & SYLLABIFICATION

Pronunciation: (fīˈnītˌ)

Syllabification: fi-nite


DEFINITIONS

View up to 25 definitions of finite from 5 different sources, as well as parts of speech.


from The American Heritage© Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition
  1. (adjective) Having bounds; limited: a finite list of choices; our finite fossil fuel reserves.
  2. (adjective) Existing, persisting, or enduring for a limited time only; impermanent.
  3. (adjective) Mathematics Being neither infinite nor infinitesimal.
  4. (adjective) Mathematics Having a positive or negative numerical value; not zero.
  5. (adjective) Mathematics Possible to reach or exceed by counting. Used of a number.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License
  1. (adjective) Limited, constrained by bounds, impermanent

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English
  1. (adjective) Having a limit; limited in quantity, degree, or capacity; bounded; -- opposed to infinite

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
  1. (None) Not too great nor too small to be naturally susceptible of measurement, whether measurable by us or not; not infinite nor infinitesimal.
  2. (None) As applied to continuous quantity, smaller than a suitably chosen finite number multiplied into the unit of measurement, and larger than a suitably chosen finite number divided by the unit of measurement.
  3. (None) In grammar, limited by person; personal; strictly verbal; not infinitival nor participial.
  4. (None) Subject to limitations or conditions, such as those of space, time, circumstances, and the laws of nature: as, a finite being; finite existence or duration.
  5. (None) Of or pertaining or relating to finite beings: as, finite passions or interests.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.
  1. (adjective) of verbs; relating to forms of the verb that are limited in time by a tense and (usually) show agreement with number and person
  2. (adjective) bounded or limited in magnitude or spatial or temporal extent