UseInSentence Examples of words in sentences

Jealous in a Sentence

Examples of jealous in a sentence

Jealous is a slightly difficult word, but we're here to help you better understand it...with EXAMPLES!

When learning new words, it's important to see how they're used, or to see them in the different contexts in which they're often used, and that's just what we'll do to help you better understand jealous (and many other English words!). By seeing different ways you can use jealous in a sentence, as well as synonyms and antonyms of jealous, you will have a much better grasp on how it should be used, and you'll feel more confortable with using it much sooner.

Below you will find the definition of jealous, followed by 38 sample sentences (from real sources), gradually increasing in length.


jealous(jĕlˈəs)

(adjective) - suspicious or unduly suspicious or fearful of being displaced by a rival

View more definitions below


EXAMPLES - Jealous in a Sentence

  1. But at the word jealous the Chief's anger revived. (source)
  2. Or, are you just plain jealous of Clinton's success? (source)
  3. S (00: 43): Using this to make me jealous is SO not cool. (source)
  4. Are you bringing this up so everybody gets kind of jealous? (source)
  5. As for his critics, Barry accused them of being "jealous" of him. (source)
  6. The first meaning of the word jealous is "watchful or solicitous." (source)
  7. I'm kind of jealous of that assignment there, the Election Express. (source)
  8. Desdemona very truly told Emilia that he was not jealous, that is, of (source)
  9. BUSH: Are you bringing this up so everybody else gets kind of jealous? (source)
  10. 'jealous' -- "merely because I sometimes bring you a book," he added slowly. (source)
  11. He actually thought I was stung with a kind of jealous pain similar to his own! (source)
  12. It makes your friends jealous, which is why we send postcards in the first place! (source)
  13. Nov. 23 update -- Silvio Berlusconi now says he is "jealous" of Obama's "tan" .... (source)
  14. This is important when the jealous is a relative or friend, because otherwise, who cares? (source)
  15. The gunman was described as a jealous off-duty sheriff's deputy who later committed suicide. (source)
  16. "It's that you're kind of jealous that they have it so easy, that they're so perfect-looking." (source)
  17. Mr. Steele, if I didn't know better, I would be suspicious that you are just plain jealous of Pres. (source)
  18. To preserve a rival of whom you are jealous, that is a trait of virtue which appertains only to you. (source)
  19. It seriously amazes me because he even said the word jealous yesterday! lol He said it very clearly too! (source)
  20. When he mentioned that he worked 40 hours a week or less, I about fell off my chair in jealous amazement. (source)
  21. One young woman suggested that her elders were "jealous" because their wrinkly bodies were no longer attractive. (source)
  22. A Georgia man described as a jealous ex-husband -- that is him there -- accused of killing three former in-laws and his baby daughter. (source)
  23. A judge today sentenced an Altamonte Springs man to life in prison for shooting his wife to death in what he described as a jealous rage. (source)
  24. Jamie fought off a brutal attack earlier this month at the hands of a woman prosecutors described as the jealous lover of her ex-boyfriend. (source)
  25. The best argument you angelina supporters can say to those who see how superficial and hypocritical this woman is is that they are "jealous". (source)
  26. And could he possibly be called jealous, because he added that, "notwithstanding his defects, Shakspeare was still the most extraordinary of men of genius?" (source)
  27. Paul, the idea that women get a little sick of male-dominated TOCS (and that POC get a little sick of white-dominated TOCS) because they are jealous is kinda old. (source)
  28. These simply mean that, because He guards the chastity of every soul, He can, in human fashion, be called jealous, although He is not subject to any mental torment. (source)
  29. She had never been jealous of Katherine for what she had materially -- and 'jealous' was the wrong word for the pangs she had always felt that her cousin had her definite place in the world. (source)
  30. What she found surprised her ... that she was "jealous" of the Nepalese and their huge extended families and close communities, and a "happiness" that comes not from material wealth, or prescription meds. (source)
  31. I have cards that actors use to kind of pull emotion - they have expressions on them like "sad," "demure," "jealous" - and I have cards that have pictures of Bart Simpson or SpongeBob with really silly expressions. (source)
  32. So jealous is Russia of this intercourse and of the lucrative transit trade carried on through Turkey with such profit to the latter empire, that she has more than once formed schemes for attracting it to her own territory, by making (source)
  33. The unhappinesses of February, March and April he attributed to real demons, not to our own fiend but to small powers at large, maleficent and alarmed, heathen powers in short, jealous of the introduction of the Holy Catholic religion. (source)
  34. Well, actually, I ` m kind of jealous that, you know, the people could get that information out of Palisades Medical Center, because we ` re always trying to get information out of, like, Cedar Sinai Medical Center, and it ` s like Fort Knox. (source)
  35. EE: Horrorville is abuzz with talk about a certain jealous writer (name withheld for security reasons) blabbing that the reason you write creepy-scary stuff is because you're really afraid of the dark and your therapist insists it will help you manage turning off the lights at night. (source)
  36. In that account, Knox was described as jealous of Kercher; Lumumba said his own wife had decided that Knox was untrustworthy based on one interaction with her; the accused also was said to flirt with customers at the bar; Lumumba also suggested that he might have been ready to fire Knox and put Kercher in her job. (source)
  37. It was a comment that lent itself to several very different interpretations: Dr. Self is right, the vast majority of people in the medical profession do look down on her; or half the people who criticize her are jealous; or it is true that she suspects half the people who criticize her are jealous, meaning they may not be jealous at all. (source)
  38. Rousseau, however, whose biographer has no such stories to tell as those of Calas and La Barre, Sirven and Lally, but only tales of a maiden wrongfully accused of theft, and a friend left senseless on the pavement of a strange town, and a benefactress abandoned to the cruelty of her fate, still was moved in the midst of his erotic visions in the forest of Montmorency to speak a jealous word in vindication of the divine government of our world. (source)

Sentence Information

The average Flesch reading-ease score of the 38 example sentences provided below is 62.0, which suggests that "jealous" is a standard word that is understood by individuals with a high school diploma or degree, and can be found in news articles, books, magazines and other places.


JEALOUS SYNONYMS

We have 32 synonyms for jealous.

anxious, apprehensive, attentive, begrudging, covetous, demanding, doubting, emulous, envious, envying, grabby, grasping, green-eyed, grudging, guarded, intolerant, invidious, jaundiced, mistrustful, monopolizing, possessive, possessory, protective, questioning, resentful, rival, skeptical, solicitous, suspicious, vigilant, watchful, zealous


JEALOUS ANTONYMS

We have 8 antonyms for jealous.

calm, confident, content, satisfied, trusting, undoubting, unresentful, unworried


PRONUNCIATION & SYLLABIFICATION

Pronunciation: (jĕlˈəs)

Syllabification: jeal-ous


DEFINITIONS

View up to 25 definitions of jealous from 5 different sources, as well as parts of speech.


from The American Heritage© Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition
  1. (adjective) Fearful or wary of being supplanted; apprehensive of losing affection or position.
  2. (adjective) Resentful or bitter in rivalry; envious: jealous of the success of others.
  3. (adjective) Inclined to suspect rivalry.
  4. (adjective) Having to do with or arising from feelings of envy, apprehension, or bitterness: jealous thoughts.
  5. (adjective) Vigilant in guarding something: We are jealous of our good name.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License
  1. (adjective) Suspecting, suspicious.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English
  1. (adjective) Zealous; solicitous; vigilant; anxiously watchful.
  2. (adjective) Apprehensive; anxious; suspiciously watchful.
  3. (adjective) Demanding exclusive devotion; intolerant of rivalry.
  4. (adjective) Disposed to suspect rivalry in matters of interest and affection; apprehensive regarding the motives of possible rivals, or the fidelity of friends; distrustful; having morbid fear of rivalry in love or preference given to another; painfully suspicious of the faithfulness of husband, wife, or lover.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
  1. (None) Full of zeal; zealous in the service of a person or cause; solicitous for the honor or interests of one's self or of another, or of some institution, cause, etc.: followed by for.
  2. (None) Anxiously watchful; suspiciously vigilant; much concerned; suspicious.
  3. (None) Specifically Troubled by the suspicion or the knowledge that the love, good will, or success one desires to retain or secure has been diverted from one's self to another or others; suspicious or bitterly resentful of successful rivalry: absolute or followed by of with an object: as, a jealous husband or lover; to be jealous of a competitor in love or in business, of one's mistress, or of the attentions of others toward her.
  4. (None) Fearful; afraid.
  5. (None) Doubtful.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.
  1. (adjective) suspicious or unduly suspicious or fearful of being displaced by a rival
  2. (adjective) showing extreme cupidity; painfully desirous of another's advantages