UseInSentence Examples of words in sentences

Judgment in a Sentence

Examples of judgment in a sentence

Judgment is a slightly difficult word, but we're here to help you better understand it...with EXAMPLES!

When learning new words, it's important to see how they're used, or to see them in the different contexts in which they're often used, and that's just what we'll do to help you better understand judgment (and many other English words!). By seeing different ways you can use judgment in a sentence, as well as synonyms and antonyms of judgment, you will have a much better grasp on how it should be used, and you'll feel more confortable with using it much sooner.

Below you will find the definition of judgment, followed by 40 sample sentences (from real sources), gradually increasing in length.


judgment

(noun) - the cognitive process of reaching a decision or drawing conclusions

View more definitions below


EXAMPLES - Judgment in a Sentence

  1. Your judgment is as sound as that of any prince in Christendom. (source)
  2. And Dick Cheney's vision has been clouded, his judgment is awry. (source)
  3. Israel, that is, the judgment is not to be confined to an outer part of (source)
  4. It's going to be bad winter if this lapse in judgment is any indication. (source)
  5. In the first case, I call the judgment analytic, in the second synthetic. (source)
  6. This judgment is arrived at, perhaps, after too perfunctory an inspection. (source)
  7. Unless the judgment is a large one, it might not be worth it to the holder. (source)
  8. You see, the cost of such errors in judgment is less than the ill-gotten gains. (source)
  9. Observe further that the word judgment (gnome) is used in many ways and in many senses. (source)
  10. The word judgment comes from the Greek word krisis; we get our English word crisis from it. (source)
  11. The enemy that should be employed as the instrument of this judgment is the king of Assyria. (source)
  12. Jo-Anne Nadler: I think we're using the word judgment in, if I might say, a very judgmental way. (source)
  13. LEMON: Is this making -- hate to say the word judgment, but some sort of judgment about Saudi society? (source)
  14. Let us call his judgment that e is a better thing to do all things considered Joseph's better judgment. (source)
  15. While the long-term judgment looks set to go the way of LTE, I am hoping the short-term battle is a quagmire. (source)
  16. Yet the judgment was considered a greater sin, just as your judgment is the real sin in this case. bitblt says: (source)
  17. We must do it solemnly, swear in judgment, that is, when judicially called to it, and not in common conversation. (source)
  18. And, although the word judgment is impeccably pronounced, the various conference documents spelled the word as judgement. (source)
  19. And you should certainly stick to index funds if you prefer the short-term judgment of the markets to the long-term views of the manager. (source)
  20. Metzner denounced what he described as a judgment that was protectionist and served France's interests -- but did not reflect truth or justice. (source)
  21. III. i.158 (368,2) Mangles true judgment] _Judgment_ is _judgment_ in its common sense, or the faculty by which right is distinguished from wrong. (source)
  22. You know we have one task before us now and it must be carried through to the exclusion of all else-Victory, which in my judgment is absolutely sure. (source)
  23. We have just been praying to God to remove from us the cholera, which we call a judgment of God, a chastisement; and God knows we have need enough to do so. (source)
  24. At other times it is used in the sense of belief, or opinion, or purpose, and, to put it shortly, the word judgment has twenty-eight [2128] different meanings. (source)
  25. Given his advanced years and, the choice of VP assumes unusual importance, and his decision is nothing short of reckless, further calling his judgment into question. (source)
  26. When any controversy about a fact became too intricate for those ignorant judges to unravel, they had recourse to what they called the judgment of God, that is, to fortune. (source)
  27. Community organizers call this a "judgment" - a conclusion reached after talking with others - as opposed to an "opinion," which is a feeling based only on one's own thoughts. (source)
  28. DOBBS: Would he, in your judgment, be -- and I hate to keep using the word judgment -- would he be as committed as the chief justice to constraining the Commerce Clause, its usage? (source)
  29. This country needs something you don't possess and after the trouble with the Bush administration, the last thing we need to follow that gross error in judgment is to hand over the keys to white trash. (source)
  30. When a defendant has been found guilty of an offence by the verdict of a jury, judgment must follow as a matter of course, "_judgment_ being the sentence of the law pronounced by the court upon the matter contained in the record." [ (source)
  31. The essential thing comes to be the reflection of the social standard in the thinker's own judgment; _the thoughts thought must always be critically judged by the thinker himself; and for the most part his judgment is at once also the social judgment_. (source)
  32. The judgment is described (1Co 11: 30-32) as temporal. not discerning -- not duty judging: not distinguishing in judgment (so the Greek: the sin and its punishment thus being marked as corresponding) from common food, the sacramental pledges of the Lord's body. (source)
  33. And he was endless in consultations: For when after much discourse a point was settled, if he could find a new jest, to make even that which was suggested by himself seem ridiculous, he could not hold, but would study to raise the credit of his wit, tho 'it made others call his judgment in question. (source)
  34. The rcfult of our judgment upon that examination is what ultimately determines the man, who could not be free if his will were determined by any thing but his own deiirc guided by his own judgment* 1 know that liberty by fome is placed in an indifFcrency of the man, antecedent to the determination of his will. (source)
  35. It was to no purpose for him to appeal to the courts at Jerusalem, he could not have justice done him there: the priests there would stand by the priests at Anathoth, and rather second them than discountenance them; but God will therefore take cognizance of the cause himself, and we are sure that his judgment is according to truth. (source)
  36. Christ will judge the secrets of men (Rom.ii. 16), will determine concerning them, not according to their own pretensions and appearances (that were to judge after the sight of the eyes), not according to the opinion others have of them (that were to judge after the hearing of the ears), but we are sure that his judgment is according to truth. (source)
  37. And how can a man teach with authority, which is the life of teaching, how can he be a doctor in his book as he ought to be, or else had better be silent, whenas all he teaches, all he delivers, is but under the tuition, under the correction of his patriarchal licenser to blot or alter what precisely accords not with the hidebound humor which he calls his judgment? (source)
  38. And how can a man teach with authority, which is the life of teaching; how can he be a doctor in his book as he ought to be, or else had better be silent, whenas all he teaches, all he delivers, is but under the tuition, under the correction of his patriarchal licenser to blot or alter what precisely accords not with the hidebound humour which he calls his judgment? (source)
  39. And how can a man teach with authority, which is the life of teaching, how can he be a _doctor_ in his book, as he ought to be or else had better be silent, whenas all he teaches, all he delivers, is but under the tuition, under the correction, of his patriarchal Licenser, to blot or alter what precisely accords not with the hide-bound humour which he calls his judgment? " (source)
  40. In the secret chambers of the soul, not of any one individual man, but of all men individually, consciousness bears testimony that such and such is the belief of all men and this we call the judgment of common sense; and such is also her testimony in all languages as to the thing that is right, and that the right in any given case is the idea we have of the good in that case. (source)

Sentence Information

The average Flesch reading-ease score of the 40 example sentences provided below is 62.0, which suggests that "judgment" is a standard word that is understood by individuals with a high school diploma or degree, and can be found in news articles, books, magazines and other places.


JUDGMENT SYNONYMS

We have 45 synonyms for judgment.

acumen, acuteness, apprehension, astuteness, awareness, brains, capacity, comprehension, discernment, discrimination, experience, genius, grasp, incisiveness, ingenuity, intelligence, intuition, keenness, knowledge, mentality, penetration, perception, percipience, perspicacity, prudence, quickness, range, rationality, reach, readiness, reason, reasoning, sagacity, sanity, sapience, savvy, sense, sharpness, shrewdness, sophistication, soundness, taste, understanding, wisdom, wit


JUDGMENT ANTONYMS

We have 9 antonyms for judgment.

ignorance, inability, inanity, indecision, ineptness, misjudgment, misunderstanding, stupidity, unsoundness


PRONUNCIATION & SYLLABIFICATION

Pronunciation:

Syllabification: judg-ment


DEFINITIONS

View up to 25 definitions of judgment from 5 different sources, as well as parts of speech.


from The American Heritage© Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition
  1. (noun) The act or process of judging; the formation of an opinion after consideration or deliberation.
  2. (noun) The mental ability to perceive and distinguish relationships; discernment: Fatigue may affect a pilot's judgment of distances.
  3. (noun) The capacity to form an opinion by distinguishing and evaluating: His judgment of fine music is impeccable.
  4. (noun) The capacity to assess situations or circumstances and draw sound conclusions; good sense: She showed good judgment in saving her money. See Synonyms at reason.
  5. (noun) An opinion or estimate formed after consideration or deliberation, especially a formal or authoritative decision: awaited the judgment of the umpire.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License
  1. (noun) The act of judging.
  2. (noun) The power or faculty of performing such operations; especially, when unqualified, the faculty of judging or deciding rightly, justly, or wisely; as, a man of judgment; a politician without judgment.
  3. (noun) The conclusion or result of judging; an opinion; a decision.
  4. (noun) The act of determining, as in courts of law, what is conformable to law and justice; also, the determination, decision, or sentence of a court, or of a judge.
  5. (noun) The final award; the last sentence.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English
  1. (noun) The act of judging; the operation of the mind, involving comparison and discrimination, by which a knowledge of the values and relations of things, whether of moral qualities, intellectual concepts, logical propositions, or material facts, is obtained
  2. (noun) The power or faculty of performing such operations (see 1); esp., when unqualified, the faculty of judging or deciding rightly, justly, or wisely; good sense
  3. (noun) The conclusion or result of judging; an opinion; a decision.
  4. (noun) The act of determining, as in courts of law, what is conformable to law and justice; also, the determination, decision, or sentence of a court, or of a judge; the mandate or sentence of God as the judge of all.
  5. (noun) That act of the mind by which two notions or ideas which are apprehended as distinct are compared for the purpose of ascertaining their agreement or disagreement. See 1. The comparison may be threefold: (1) Of individual objects forming a concept. (2) Of concepts giving what is technically called a judgment. (3) Of two judgments giving an inference. Judgments have been further classed as analytic, synthetic, and identical.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
  1. (noun) The faculty of judging.
  2. (noun) Specifically— The intellectual power of perceiving relations between ideas, as the relations of similarity, difference, etc.
  3. (noun) The act of judging. The act of affirming (or denying) a relation (as of similarity or difference) between two ideas.
  4. (noun) The process of arriving at a conclusion or decision; the determination of a doubtful or debatable matter.
  5. (noun) The product of the mental act of judging; the recognition of a relation between objects; a mental affirmation or proposition; the thought that a given general representation is really applicable to a certain object; the actual consciousness of belief.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.
  1. (noun) the cognitive process of reaching a decision or drawing conclusions
  2. (noun) the legal document stating the reasons for a judicial decision
  3. (noun) an opinion formed by judging something
  4. (noun) the act of judging or assessing a person or situation or event
  5. (noun) the capacity to assess situations or circumstances shrewdly and to draw sound conclusions