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Lampoon in a Sentence

Examples of lampoon in a sentence

Lampoon is a pretty challenging word, but we're here to help you better understand it...with EXAMPLES!

When learning new words, it's important to see how they're used, or to see them in the different contexts in which they're often used, and that's just what we'll do to help you better understand lampoon (and many other English words!). By seeing different ways you can use lampoon in a sentence, as well as synonyms and antonyms of lampoon, you will have a much better grasp on how it should be used, and you'll feel more confortable with using it much sooner.

Below you will find the definition of lampoon, followed by 37 sample sentences (from real sources), gradually increasing in length.


lampoon(lăm-po͞onˈ)

(verb) - ridicule with satire

View more definitions below


EXAMPLES - Lampoon in a Sentence

  1. In fact it's meant to lampoon the whole Prop. 8 gay marriage ban. (source)
  2. Newspaper cartoons regularly lampoon him as an authoritarian jackboot. (source)
  3. It develops jerkily, in a mixture of capering lampoon and instructive songs. (source)
  4. Frightened of your brightness or that you will lampoon them or put them down? (source)
  5. I'll pass on the Toradora 13, I did kind of lampoon it's cheesiness in my coverage~ (source)
  6. Mr. Crinklaw also forwarded by e-mail a statement from Chevron that called the lampoon (source)
  7. COOPER: The sketch then went on to lampoon Mr. Obama for Chicago losing the 2016 Olympic Games. (source)
  8. Colorado icons Trey Parker and Matt Stone didn't have to look far for their latest subject to lampoon. (source)
  9. I called Liszt's article a criticism, but "lampoon" or "libel" would have been a more appropriate designation. (source)
  10. Lord President Stair; and the lampoon, which is written with much more malice than art, bears the following motto: (source)
  11. His latest single is a lampoon of the online classifieds site Craigslist, set (inexplicably) to music by the Doors. (source)
  12. Comedy Central heavily censored a recent episode of the cartoon series which sought to lampoon the Prophet Mohammed. (source)
  13. Baby Jane is no longer a star but rather a lampoon of the worst of what even Hollywood's glitz and make-up cannot hide. (source)
  14. Chevron is scrambling to deal with an elaborate lampoon of a major advertising campaign that the company introduced on Monday. (source)
  15. * Obama and the White House lampoon GOP Rep. Pete Hoekstra for showing up at a ribbon cutting for a stimulus-funded project after opposing the stimulus. (source)
  16. That's just one of the questions posed by the Official Monster Raving Loony Party, a running lampoon of the British political scene for nearly three decades. (source)
  17. What began 20 years ago as a fluke then erupted into a pop-culture juggernaut has continued to spin yarns, spawn characters and lampoon society with no end in sight. (source)
  18. That is just one of the questions posed by the Official Monster Raving Loony Party, a lampoon of the British political scene that has been running for nearly three decades. (source)
  19. Now this is the quintessential lampoon cartoon of two very well known candidates, the characters, one of whom you'll probably be just doing a lot more of in the coming years. (source)
  20. The so-called lampoon is designed to provoke outrage against Google's perceived privacy intrusions, but some viewers may find the privacy group's tactics even more outrageous. (source)
  21. Comedians routinely lampoon elements of Mormon belief and practice, while political commentators like Lawrence O'Donnell have delivered diatribes targeting the faith and its founders. (source)
  22. Though Shakespeare was using the word to lampoon the pretentiousness of Elizabethan pedagogues, there was a joy in the cascade of vowels and consonants that beat anything I had heard on television. (source)
  23. My literary agent pitched that idea unsuccessfully, and a year later an Irish comedian scored with his self-discovery lampoon of Gilbert's new bible for solo women travel entitled Drink, Play, F@#k. (source)
  24. Thanks for those links :) Obviously I assumed they were 'lampooning' the sort of show I mentioned I'll use the word lampoon at any given opportunity...) it just seems a bit of a random one to choose! (source)
  25. On the Treasurer's enforced retirement, Swift's resentment took effect in the above "lampoon" which was read at Harley's, on the 15th October, 1710, and "ran prodigiously," but was not then "suspected for Swift's." (source)
  26. People lampoon the Occupy Wall Street movement as a bunch of marginal freaks, but these women from the heart of the country shared a basic resentment: The banks got bailed out, everyone else was left holding the bag. (source)
  27. The problem is that Snyder, following Moore, is so insanely aroused by the look of vengeance, and by the stylized application of physical power, that the film ends up twice as fascistic as the forces it wishes to lampoon. (source)
  28. There was a bitter and personal quarrel and rivalry betwixt the author of this libel, a name which it richly deserves, and Lord President Stair; and the lampoon, which is written with much more malice than art, bears the following motto: (source)
  29. There are no subjects, no public figures, no cows so sacred that creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone won't lampoon them, and it seems as though they take pleasure in satirizing subjects for no other reason than that other people don't dare go near them. (source)
  30. While there is no official word about whether its development owes any direct thanks to Roberts 'Hell House Outreach kits -- odds are strong that the lampoon is a more than fitting homage for a profoundly anti-sex, anti-equality message that belongs buried in the dark ages of antiquity. (source)
  31. Lucky for Littell he was writing, as it turns out, for an appreciative (French) audience; they seem aware, largely, of the fact that the novel has a right to present its horrors as horrible; its subtle arguments without convenient keys and its jokes quite bitter if the world they lampoon is inarguably cruel. (source)
  32. Having established with this analogy that A is terrible, it follows that we must then abandon A, go to war against A, stop believing A, vote A down, invade a Middle Eastern country that starts with A, keep A out of our schools, send the CIA to kill A, lampoon A until it is a laughingstock, or all of the above. (source)
  33. According to sources, a fascinating Hollywood ritual has been taking place each year for the past eight decades at which prominent members of the film community gather to lampoon themselves and their craft by staging an elaborate "roast" cleverly framed as a lavish tribute to the mere fact of their professional existence. (source)
  34. And so when I saw that the May issue of Esquire was devoted almost entirely to the vexing (and presumably profitable) topic of "How to Be a Man", complete with lists of man things to own, man things to do, manly men to emulate and manly behaviors to cultivate, my initial reaction was to lampoon it with a few smart-ass quips and a list of my own. (source)
  35. She will lampoon "Cameron's stupendously inane soundbite about a security fightback being followed by a social fightback" and claim the prime minister's vision for dealing with socially excluded people is "the idea of ghettoes, where the undeserving poor can be kept and contained through heavy policing, CCTV surveillance and the use of benefits as a stick to intimidate." (source)
  36. Lord Rochester's frolics in the character of a mountebank are well known, and the speech which he made upon the occasion of his first turning itinerant doctor, has been often printed; there is in it a true spirit of satire, and a keenness of lampoon, which is very much in the character of his lordship, who had certainly an original turn for invective and satirical composition. (source)
  37. Federal and local authorities are also playing down speculation that the attempted bombing might somehow be linked to recent threats by an obscure but rabid Islamic extremist faction against the creators of South Park, who tried to lampoon the Prophet Mohammed in a recent two-part episode which was heavily censored by Comedy Central, the cable channel which airs the scatalogical satire. (source)

Sentence Information

The average Flesch reading-ease score of the 37 example sentences provided below is 46.0, which suggests that "lampoon" is a difficult word that tends to be used by individuals of higher education, and is likely found in more advanced literature or in academia.


LAMPOON SYNONYMS

We have 13 synonyms for lampoon.

burlesque, caricature, invective, pasquil, pasquinade, pastiche, ridicule, roast, send-up, skit, squib, takedown, takeoff


LAMPOON ANTONYMS

We have 2 antonyms for lampoon.

flattery, praise


PRONUNCIATION & SYLLABIFICATION

Pronunciation: (lăm-po͞onˈ)

Syllabification: lam-poon


DEFINITIONS

View up to 25 definitions of lampoon from 5 different sources, as well as parts of speech.


from The American Heritage© Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition
  1. (noun) A written attack ridiculing a person, group, or institution. See Synonyms at caricature.
  2. (noun) A light, good-humored satire.
  3. (verb-transitive) To ridicule or satirize in or as if in a lampoon.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License
  1. (noun) A written attack ridiculing a person, group, or institution.
  2. (noun) A light, good-humored satire.
  3. (verb) To satirize or poke fun at.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English
  1. (noun) A personal satire in writing; usually, malicious and abusive censure written only to reproach and distress.
  2. (noun) Any satire ridiculing or mocking a person, activity, or institution by representing its character or behavior in an exaggerated or grotesque form; the representation may be written, filmed, or performed as a live skit, and may be intended as a severe reproach, or as good-natured humor.
  3. (verb-transitive) To subject to abusive ridicule expressed in a work of art; to make (a person, behavior, or institution) the subject of a lampoon.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
  1. (noun) A sarcastic writing aimed at a person's character, habits, or actions; a personal satire; a sarcastic diatribe; humorous abuse in writing.
  2. (None) To abuse in a lampoon; write lampoons against.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.
  1. (verb) ridicule with satire
  2. (noun) a composition that imitates or misrepresents somebody's style, usually in a humorous way