UseInSentence Examples of words in sentences

Lapse in a Sentence

Examples of lapse in a sentence

Lapse is a pretty challenging word, but we're here to help you better understand it...with EXAMPLES!

When learning new words, it's important to see how they're used, or to see them in the different contexts in which they're often used, and that's just what we'll do to help you better understand lapse (and many other English words!). By seeing different ways you can use lapse in a sentence, as well as synonyms and antonyms of lapse, you will have a much better grasp on how it should be used, and you'll feel more confortable with using it much sooner.

Below you will find the definition of lapse, followed by 43 sample sentences (from real sources), gradually increasing in length.


lapse(lăps)

(verb) - pass into a specified state or condition

View more definitions below


EXAMPLES - Lapse in a Sentence

  1. One man's ethical lapse is another's client servicing. (source)
  2. Damage from a short-term lapse would probably be minimal. (source)
  3. Sorry for the momentary brain lapse on the show this week. (source)
  4. This lapse is outside the reviewer proper arena of commentary. (source)
  5. You know you let your title lapse and now you're trying to evade the law. (source)
  6. In normal times, states might withstand a short-term lapse in federal funding. (source)
  7. Too, re-entry in many professions after a few year's lapse is extremely difficult. (source)
  8. The mayor is apologizing, saying he's deeply sorry for what he calls a lapse of judgment. (source)
  9. The explanation of the lapse was a suddenly conceived prejudice at the moment of first meeting. (source)
  10. Adelaide coach Neil Craig said his men were, with the exception of a last-term lapse, in fine shape. (source)
  11. It was a week of weakness he later termed a lapse in judgment, a phrase that gave haven from disgrace. (source)
  12. Normally in the troposphere temperature falls with height, the rate of fall being described as the lapse rate. (source)
  13. Times, which evidently sees that "lapse" as news not fit to print (unless, of course, Zeleny hadn't heard about it). (source)
  14. Some of the reports say the unauthorized trades go back to 2008, which would be a pretty long-term lapse in controls. (source)
  15. Two, is enrollments of people who have been before so in other words lapse members or rejoins and three, is retention. (source)
  16. Palmieri let the deadline for the designation lapse without calling for a board vote, essentially putting the project on ice. (source)
  17. Stony Brook medical student's photo with cadaver is off Facebook university called a lapse in judgment, the Stony Brook University (source)
  18. "I understand people are suspicious, but it was a BRA decision to let their designation lapse because they did not perform at all." (source)
  19. News anchor's 'heads up' to target of expose called lapse in judgment Reaction to Obama's speech a glimpse into political divide (231 comments) (source)
  20. The planning lapse is all the more inexplicable because his opponent, Republican Meg Whitman, was ridiculed for doing exactly the same last week. (source)
  21. On the streets of Baghdad, many Iraqis were angry at what they described as a lapse in security and wary about what will happen when US forces leave. (source)
  22. On the streets of Baghdad, many Iraqis were angry at what they described as a lapse in security and wary about what will happen when U.S. forces leave. (source)
  23. Food safety experts say the lapse is a major concern and shows state inspectors are spread thin and might need more training on how to spot unsanitary conditions. (source)
  24. Arriving in Bangkok, I watched the temperatures as the plane descended in the late evening and as I recall the lapse rate at 11 pm was only about 3 deg C in the lowest (source)
  25. Biden said the lapse was a process mistake, but he praised the selection of Panetta, calling the Californian a "strong figure" for the CIA who would "take it on a new path." (source)
  26. The landowners spent tens of thousands of dollars and one day each month for four years conducting the study, only to have the designation lapse due to agency oversight, Rex said. (source)
  27. Biden said the lapse was a process mistake, but he praised the selection of Panetta, calling the Californian a ` ` strong figure '' for the CIA who would ` ` take it on a new path. '' (source)
  28. Zimbabwe protested to the British government over what it called a lapse in security when President Robert Mugabe was mobbed by gay activists during a visit to London, British officials said (source)
  29. It travelled across the continent, and after a certain lapse of time the postman returned him the manuscript in another long envelope, on the outside of which were the stamps he had enclosed. (source)
  30. She was just on the Leno show to publicly announce -- again -- that she had a "lapse" and that was the reason she repeatedly lied in stump speeches about running from sniper fire in Tuzla, Bosnia. (source)
  31. They are apt to allow allow the malware update subscriptions to lapse, which is a big mistake, because they might suddenly find themselves inundated with unwanted popups and other symptoms of an infected PC. (source)
  32. He had yielded to the fleshly impulse, and the measure of his lapse was the sincerity of that nobler desire; he had not the excuse of the ordinary man, nor ever tried to allay his conscience with facile views of life. (source)
  33. The statute equates to a kid will be in Brazil during least until Feb. 1, following a judges 'lapse from a recess, according to a justice orator who commented upon condition of anonymity as he was not authorized to plead a case. (source)
  34. So while I'm not disagreeing with the overall distortion of Obama's point, which is a good one, I am trying to put something out there that makes this kind of lapse or shoddiness or laziness of whatever it is more likely and, indeed, expected. (source)
  35. To some consumers, the manufacturing problems were " perceived as a short-term lapse in competence, " said Chris Malone , chief advisory officer at Relational Capital Group, which questioned 1,000 adults across the U.S. in September and October. (source)
  36. "There is only one explanation for this lapse from the Americanism of former days: we are being brainwashed into the belief that we can safely do business with communism -- brainwashed by an interlocked group of so-called 'educational' organizations offering (source)
  37. And unlike, say, large infrastructure projects, aid to the unemployed creates jobs quickly - while allowing that aid to lapse, which is what is happening right now, is a recipe for even weaker job growth, not in the distant future but over the next few months. (source)
  38. Secret Service on Friday defended its handling of security during a massive rally in downtown Dallas for Barack Obama, saying there was no "lapse" in its "comprehensive and layered security plan," which called for some people to be checked for weapons, while others were not. ' (source)
  39. The U.S. Secret Service on Friday defended its handling of security during a massive rally in downtown Dallas for Barack Obama, saying there was no 'lapse' in its 'comprehensive and layered security plan,' which called for some people to be checked for weapons, while others were not. (source)
  40. The benefit of this over completely deleting your blog or letting your domain name lapse and someone else grabbing it is that you keep the option open of using it again later and if you are monetizing it you have the opportunity to keep earning a little money from it in the mean time. (source)
  41. According to my view, experience as a whole is a process in time, whereby innumerable particular terms lapse and are superseded by others that follow upon them by transitions which, whether disjunctive or conjunctive in content, are themselves experiences, and must in general be accounted at least as real as the terms which they relate. (source)
  42. Mrs Fitzpatrick was a little nettled at this; and indeed, if it may not be called a lapse of the tongue, it was a small deviation from politeness in Jones, and into which he scarce would have fallen, had not the delight he felt in praising Sophia hurried him out of all reflection; for this commendation of one cousin was more than a tacit rebuke on the other. (source)
  43. Mrs. Fitzpatrick was a little nettled at this; and indeed, if it may not be called a lapse of the tongue, it was a small deviation from politeness in Jones, and into which he scarce would have fallen, had not the delight he felt in praising Sophia hurried him out of all reflection; for this commendation of one cousin was more than a tacit rebuke on the other. (source)

Sentence Information

The average Flesch reading-ease score of the 43 example sentences provided below is 49.0, which suggests that "lapse" is a difficult word that tends to be used by individuals of higher education, and is likely found in more advanced literature or in academia.


LAPSE SYNONYMS

We have 29 synonyms for lapse.

blunder, breach, bungle, crime, error, failing, failure, fault, flub, foible, frailty, gaff, goof, goof-up, indiscretion, miscue, negligence, offense, omission, oversight, screw-up, sin, slip, slip-up, transgression, trespass, trip, vice, violation


LAPSE ANTONYMS

We have 15 antonyms for lapse.

accuracy, achievement, advantage, behavior, care, continuity, correction, kindness, obedience, perfection, progress, remembrance, right, strength, success


PRONUNCIATION & SYLLABIFICATION

Pronunciation: (lăps)

Syllabification: ['lapse']


DEFINITIONS

View up to 25 definitions of lapse from 5 different sources, as well as parts of speech.


from The American Heritage© Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition
  1. (verb-intransitive) To fall from a previous level or standard, as of accomplishment, quality, or conduct: lapse into bad habits; a team that lapsed into mediocrity halfway through the season.
  2. (verb-intransitive) To deviate from a prescribed or accepted way: lapse into heresy.
  3. (verb-intransitive) To pass gradually or smoothly; slip: lapse into reverie.
  4. (verb-intransitive) To come to an end, especially gradually or temporarily: He realized that his attention had lapsed and he hadn't heard the assignment.
  5. (verb-intransitive) To be no longer valid or active; expire: She allowed her membership to lapse after the first year.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License
  1. (noun) A temporary failure; a slip.
  2. (noun) A decline or fall in standards.
  3. (noun) A pause in continuity.
  4. (noun) An interval of time between events.
  5. (noun) A termination of a right etc, through disuse or neglect.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English
  1. (noun) A gliding, slipping, or gradual falling; an unobserved or imperceptible progress or passing away,; -- restricted usually to immaterial things, or to figurative uses.
  2. (noun) A slip; an error; a fault; a failing in duty; a slight deviation from truth or rectitude.
  3. (noun) The termination of a right or privilege through neglect to exercise it within the limited time, or through failure of some contingency; hence, the devolution of a right or privilege.
  4. (noun) A fall or apostasy.
  5. (verb-intransitive) To pass slowly and smoothly downward, backward, or away; to slip downward, backward, or away; to glide; -- mostly restricted to figurative uses.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
  1. (noun) A falling; a continued falling off or away; a passing or gliding along or away: as, the lapse of flowing water; the lapse of time.
  2. (noun) A gradual fall or descent; passage downward, physical or moral; a passing from a higher to a lower place, state, or condition: as, a lapse from integrity; a lapse into sin.
  3. (noun) A failure or miscarriage through some fault, slip, or negligence; hence, a slip or fault in general; a mistake from carelessness or inattention: as, a lapse of justice; a lapse of title to an estate; a lapse of the tongue or of grammar.
  4. (noun) In English ecclesiastical law, the failure or omission of a patron to present a clerk to a benefice within the time allowed him, six months from avoidance, in which event the benefice is said to be lapsed or in lapse, and the right of presentation passes to the bishop.
  5. (None) To fall; slip; slide; glide; sink; pass slowly, silently, or by degrees.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.
  1. (verb) pass into a specified state or condition
  2. (verb) drop to a lower level, as in one's morals or standards
  3. (verb) end, at least for a long time
  4. (noun) a break or intermission in the occurrence of something
  5. (noun) a mistake resulting from inattention