UseInSentence Examples of words in sentences

Vague in a Sentence

Examples of vague in a sentence

Vague is a pretty tough word, but we're here to help you better understand it...with EXAMPLES!

When learning new words, it's important to see how they're used, or to see them in the different contexts in which they're often used, and that's just what we'll do to help you better understand vague (and many other English words!). By seeing different ways you can use vague in a sentence, as well as synonyms and antonyms of vague, you will have a much better grasp on how it should be used, and you'll feel more confortable with using it much sooner.

Below you will find the definition of vague, followed by 43 sample sentences (from real sources), gradually increasing in length.


vague(vāg)

(adjective) - lacking clarity or distinctness

View more definitions below


EXAMPLES - Vague in a Sentence

  1. I purposely remain vague to allow the input of my collaborators. (source)
  2. I recall my vague idea that we must have fallen down the cliff .... (source)
  3. "Curious!" echoed Rebecca, finding the term vague even while suggestive. (source)
  4. | Martin Schulz on 'vague' Barroso: 'one day he is left-wing, the next liberal' (source)
  5. Afterward he recalled a vague, half-conscious impression of being lifted on a horse. (source)
  6. I have used the English word vague as an equivalent of that word in Japanese aimaina. (source)
  7. Grimm's theoretical utter - ances have been called vague, and so they seem at first blush. (source)
  8. Instead it sent out what has been described as a vague letter to various legal organizations. (source)
  9. This has resulted in vague, imprecise tasting notes with limited potential for awarding marks. (source)
  10. The sound recalled the vague moaning that first aroused her to any knowledge of Kara's accident. (source)
  11. The report also says more journalists are being jailed on what the CPJ describes as vague charges. (source)
  12. I declare that I thought of nothing more; not even recalling the vague unease felt on entering the room. (source)
  13. INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENT (voice over): It was what the French like to call a vague de maree, a tidal wave. (source)
  14. The Jewish afterlife, as far as I know, is a little vague, which is one of the reasons there are not a lot of Jews. (source)
  15. These _vague_ articles, intended for a more vague performance, are the things which have damned our reputation in India. (source)
  16. I don't think the sense that the deck is stacked against urban school districts is "vague" -- there are a lot of big challenges. (source)
  17. And after a spell if somebody mentioned Texas maybe I'd recall vague that I knew someone who was down there, and wonder who it was. (source)
  18. I recalled vague rumors of the Silent Ones, and concluded that, eerie though it seemed, this was merely their way of doing business. (source)
  19. They must remain vague, at times numbingly so, in order to conceal the preposterously transparent sleight-of-hand of their fiscal policy. (source)
  20. It also has been called vague, subjecting people to prosecution for mistakes and minor transgressions in the business and political worlds. (source)
  21. In one instance, it can be difficult to recall a vague but happy memory, and on the other hand, it can physically hurt when memories are vivid. (source)
  22. Weber himself is at least partly to blame for this problem, for he frequently left the term vague, in spite of many attempts to clarify himself. (source)
  23. What you'll find in the latter is fairly vague, which is understandable since it needs to be flexible enough to meet many institutional contexts. (source)
  24. Demand more from the people who give vague, meaningless descriptions, just as you do whenever a politician gives vague or meaningless information. (source)
  25. With the enemy gone and no acute situation to rally us together, we spent nearly twenty years building bunkers in vague anticipation of complete annihilation. (source)
  26. She was made glad in vague ways by the battle, for this was the love-making of the Wild, the sex-tragedy of the natural world that was tragedy only to those that died. (source)
  27. If any one finds the phrase vague or threadbare, I can only pause for a moment to explain that the principle of democracy, as I mean it, can be stated in two propositions. (source)
  28. Now, Booth hopes to pick another court fight to clarify what he calls a "vague" situation that has left pastors uncertain about what they can and can't say from the pulpit. (source)
  29. Scottish business school student Steven Renwick used to harbor what he called a "vague aspiration" to get his MBA from an American institution such as the Stanford Graduate School of Business. (source)
  30. It is hard to see any practical reason for this change of fashion: it is probably due to an instinctive turning-away from the more homely word and a vague feeling that the Greek word is scientific. (source)
  31. Memories of what occurred may surface weeks or sometimes months, later as dreams or recollections initiated by associations or events that recall vague glimpses of what happened, often causing bewilderment. (source)
  32. None could be found except that of rendering this company a commercial one; this was, under a gentler name, a name vague and unpretending, to hand over to it the entire and exclusive commerce of the country. (source)
  33. With all your daughter has had, there is one great thing that she hasn't had; and if you had placed me near her, my idea, which I call vague, would have been -- as far as any one could do it now -- to supply her with some of that. " (source)
  34. In 2008, the Vatican's delegation to the U.N. General Assembly called for an "end to all criminal penalties" against "homosexual persons," but voted against a proposed U.N. gay rights declaration that it called vague and excessively far-reaching. (source)
  35. FMA1 has a reunited Assembly "reverse the Ishval policy and help them rebuild on their own land," keeping the socio-political dealings with the Ishvalans relatively vague, which is understandable given the focus of the show is Ed and not Ishvalans. (source)
  36. And "the following" are the things that are specified in the Detainee Treatment Act. QUESTION: (OFF-MIKE) you do not address -- you do not address the language that you think is vague, which is in Article 3 now, which has to do with outrages and ... (source)
  37. Their purpose in doing this is stated in terms vague enough that I like to think that they are using guns the way some people took a drink when hearing about the latest doings of Bush II --- to calm the anxiety they feel when a government not of their choosing is in power. (source)
  38. I actually watched the so-called convention on c-span yesterday while exercising and was astounded as I watched speaker after speaker rail and spew in vague generalities not once did anyone actually propose any concrete proposal for a solution to any of their paranoid rants. (source)
  39. An initial draft of the resolution, prepared by France and Britain, had language, I was told, that called for the exercise of "vigilance" involving arms transfers to Syria - a word vague enough for the Russians to have agreed to it last year in the latest round of U.N. sanctions against Iran. (source)
  40. They have been quietly pushing for sweeping federal immigration reform, which would include a path to legal residency, but they speak a vague diplomatic language that calls for "respect" and "dignity" for illegal migrants, while pointing out their contributions to both the U.S. and Mexican economies. (source)
  41. Others recalled the vague rumors which had come from far, far away in the Southland, from tribes whose very names were unknown, of other palefaces (the Spanish colonists in the West Indies), who had brought fire and fighting into peaceful, happy islands of the summer seas, who like terrible, powerful demons, spread about them death and strange diseases. (source)
  42. Jermyn Street were nearly void of their fat clients; he could saunter over to Covent Garden, buy a melon, and carry it home without meeting any but the most inferior duchesses in Piccadilly; on warm nights he could stroll the streets or the parks, smoking his cigar, his hat pushed back to cool his forehead, thinking vague thoughts, recalling vague memories. (source)
  43. Yet despite this well-known pattern of exploitation, the company announced in January that Immigration and Customs Enforcement had awarded it a 5-year $385 million contract to build immigrant "detention facilities" (prisons) for immigrants arrested on charges of entering the country illegally and to provide construction and logistics support services in the event of an "immigration emergency," a term vague enough to cause activists to suspect the worst -- that they are openly planning to build detention camps for political dissidents. (source)

Sentence Information

The average Flesch reading-ease score of the 43 example sentences provided below is 50.0, which suggests that "vague" is a fairly difficult word that is likely understood by a majority of individuals with an undergraduate degree, and may be found in ocassionaly in news articles or other forms of literature.


VAGUE SYNONYMS

We have 47 synonyms for vague.

ambiguous, amorphous, amphibological, bewildering, bleary, blurred, cloudy, dark, dim, doubtful, dreamlike, dubious, enigmatic, equivocal, faint, fuzzy, generalized, hazy, ill-defined, impalpable, imprecise, indefinite, indeterminate, indistinct, inexplicable, lax, loose, misunderstood, muddy, nebulous, obscure, perplexing, problematic, puzzling, questionable, shadowy, superficial, tenebrous, uncertain, unclear, undetermined, unexplicit, unintelligible, unknown, unsettled, unspecified, unsure


VAGUE ANTONYMS

We have 11 antonyms for vague.

apparent, certain, clear, definite, determined, distinct, explicit, obvious, plain, secure, sure


PRONUNCIATION & SYLLABIFICATION

Pronunciation: (vāg)

Syllabification: ['vague']


DEFINITIONS

View up to 25 definitions of vague from 5 different sources, as well as parts of speech.


from The American Heritage© Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition
  1. (adjective) Not clearly expressed; inexplicit.
  2. (adjective) Not thinking or expressing oneself clearly.
  3. (adjective) Lacking definite shape, form, or character; indistinct: saw a vague outline of a building through the fog.
  4. (adjective) Not clear in meaning or application. See Synonyms at ambiguous.
  5. (adjective) Indistinctly felt, perceived, understood, or recalled; hazy: a vague uneasiness.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License
  1. (adjective) not clearly expressed; stated in indefinite terms.
  2. (adjective) not having a precise meaning.
  3. (adjective) not clearly defined, grasped, or understood; indistinct; slight.
  4. (adjective) not clearly felt or sensed; somewhat subconscious.
  5. (adjective) not thinking or expressing one’s thoughts clearly or precisely.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English
  1. (adjective) Wandering; vagrant; vagabond.
  2. (adjective) Unsettled; unfixed; undetermined; indefinite; ambiguous.
  3. (adjective) Proceeding from no known authority; unauthenticated; uncertain; flying.
  4. (noun) An indefinite expanse.
  5. (verb-intransitive) To wander; to roam; to stray.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
  1. (None) Wandering; roving; vagrant.
  2. (None) Uncertain as to characters and specific designation, yet limited in scope and application; restricted in logical breadth, without any corresponding fullness of logical depth; said to be determinate, but without precise expression of the determination.
  3. (None) Proceeding from no known authority; of uncertain origin or derivation: as, a vague report.
  4. (None) Having unclear perception or thought; not thinking clearly.
  5. (noun) A wandering; a journey; a voyage.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.
  1. (adjective) lacking clarity or distinctness
  2. (adjective) not clearly understood or expressed
  3. (adjective) not precisely limited, determined, or distinguished